Saturday, May 07, 2011

Long-Prized Tech Visas Lose Cachet - WSJ.com

What with the stagnant economy among other things, it looks like the worm is starting to turn for beleaguered geeks and other victims of H1B slavery. Ron Hira, of the Rochester Institute of Technology, finally getting some press:

At the House Subcommittee on Immigration, a critic of the program, Ronil Hira, highlighted that Indian companies operating in the U.S., such as Infosys, Tata and Wipro, are among the biggest H-1B users, and that they're bringing in foreigners with ordinary skills.

In an interview, Mr. Hira, a professor of public policy at Rochester Institute of Technology, said that 'because of loopholes, employers can bring in cheaper foreign workers to substitute for American workers and undercut their wages.'

His research indicates only about a third of all H-1B visa holders are 'really highly skilled or graduates of U.S. universities who would be eventually sponsored for green cards,' or permanent U.S. residency, by their employers. Employers have said that the program enables them to tap top talent, whom they seek to hire permanently down the road."

(Via Long-Prized Tech Visas Lose Cachet - WSJ.com.)

Of course, my little sahib Vivek '#Fraudhwa' Wadhwa had his day in the sun. But he didn't say anything we don't already know.

It's a shame. Wadhwa the academic seems to be a nice guy. Fraudhwa the NASSCOM lobbyist? That's another matter.

Drunky out.

2 comments:

Mukesh Speak said...

H-1B as a remedy for labor shortages and as a means of hiring "the best and the brightest" from around the world (which I

strongly support), the vast majority are ordinary people doing ordinary work. Instead of being about talent, H-1B is about cheap labor.

H-1B visa holders may only work for sponsoring employers after approval by the Departments of Labor and Homeland Security.

Although most of the non-compliant H-1B workers had posted wages from employers in fields associated with technical or

specialty occupations, the report noted that one H-1B worker had earnings from a restaurant and janitorial service.

Thank's
and
Regard's
H-1b visa

Mukesh Speak said...

H-1B as a remedy for labor shortages and as a means of hiring "the best and the brightest" from around the world (which I

strongly support), the vast majority are ordinary people doing ordinary work. Instead of being about talent, H-1B is about cheap labor.

H-1B visa holders may only work for sponsoring employers after approval by the Departments of Labor and Homeland Security.

Although most of the non-compliant H-1B workers had posted wages from employers in fields associated with technical or

specialty occupations, the report noted that one H-1B worker had earnings from a restaurant and janitorial service.

Thank's
and
Regard's
H-1b visa

Drunky.Popular